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Music On Art Resources

Friday Fun Trifecta #10

If you remember a while back, we did a segment here on SDMcKinley.com called Friday Fun Links. Fun links have evolved into Friday Fun Trifecta, where I will feature one thing of each – music, book and visual arts. Welcome to Friday Fun Trifecta #10, in appreciation for artwork.

Book Giveaway Update:

We’ll have a Rafflecopter giveaway with with the 10 Years of Darkness review coming on Feb. 8th, in cooperation with the authors’ blog tour, but that isn’t the giveaway I’m focusing on, in addition I’ll have two self hosted book giveaways soon on SDMcKinley.com:

You know it’s kind of one of those funny things that just happens sometimes: I ordered and read Gridlinked by Neal Asher and looking back, it’s one of those books I woke up early to read. It’s just that good. I ordered another one to pack in a giveaway with a couple other books, to boot. Sadly, I came close to losing all hope for it arriving, having ordered it around Dec. 15th and no status updates from USPS since Dec. 21st . . . Will I ever see it?

Surprise! Yesterday, Amazon refunded me the money and low and behold, there it was sitting on my coffee table when I arrived. And, what did I do with the refunded money? I ordered another one. Three copies of Gridlinked is what I’ll end up with and I’ll do a astounding two separate giveaways, one will be very soon and the other one will launch when the third copy arrives, which could take a month if it was like the last one. What is happening to USPS? Geez. It could change, but I’m thinking a three book giveaway of different authors. Man, talk about silver linings.

Music:

No lyrics involved with this soothing meditational music, here. – Genre: Electronic chill step.

What is Blackmill? The best way I can describe it: Elevator music for millennials, ha ha. Sometime you just need something without all the words in it, swaying you one way or the other. It’s meditational and naturistic.

Speaking of that, you ever call a company and the on-hold music is so horrendous you can’t even think, like they put a devil frequency in it, with the volume going up and down like a demon-possessed-wire trying to steal all your energy while waiting on the phone for 60 minutes? By the time the company actually picks up, you’ve already pulled your hair into pieces like that crazy Stephanie girl you knew when you were a teenager? Those telephone system-admins could really use a lesson on proper music to put in their on-hold telephone systems straight from Blackmill themselves.

Book:

A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge

“The illusion of self-awareness. Happy automatons, running on trivial programs. I’ll bet you never guess. From the inside, how can you?”

― Vernor Vinge, A Fire Upon the Deep

“[The Universe] does not care, and even with all our science there are some disasters that we can not avert. All evil and good is petty before nature. Personally, we take comfort from this, that there is a universe to admire that can not be twisted to villainy or good, but which simply is.”

― Vernor Vinge, A Fire Upon the Deep

[ Quote Source: GoodReads.com ]

Visual:

Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi

Disarming new findings on Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi @ TheArtNewspaper.com. More information about this piece via LeonardoDaVinci.net:

“Leonardo paints Salvator Mundi possibly for King Louis XII of France and his consort, Anne of Brittany. It is most likely commissioned soon after the conquests of Milan and Genoa.

The 26-inch haunting oil-on-panel painting depicts a half-length figure of Christ as Savior of the World, facing front and dressed in Renaissance-era robes. In his painting, Leonardo presents Christ as he is characterized in the Gospel of John 4:14: ‘And we have seen and testify that the Father has sent his Son as the Saviour of the World.’ Christ gazes fixedly at the spectator, lightly bearded with auburn ringlets, holding a crystal sphere in his left hand and offering benediction with his right.

Salvator Mundi was at once time believed to have been destroyed. The painting disappeared from 1763 until 1900, when it was bought by Sir Charles Robinson as a work by Bernardino Luini, a follower of Leonardo. It next appeared at a Sotheby’s in England in 1958 where it sold for £45 – about $125 at the time. It then disappeared again until it was bought at a small U.S. auction house in 2005.”

[ Source: leonardodavinci.net ]

Guys and gals, until next time – may you find all the happiness that your life can fit in it’s happy spot – S.D. McKinley.

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On Art Resources

Internet Sleuth: What Happened to Philip Wylie and the FBI? Part #1

NOTE: This article best viewed in full web view with table of contents and other hidden features that do not show in WordPress Reader.

NOTE: While taking a moment to decide whether I would just use referenced links in the post while writing something condensed for you or rather string it all out in a line. No, I will not be using only links and condensed writings to reference things or attempt to write something that simply skips the surface leaving you in yet another vat of skim milk, instead I will allow you to follow my train of research. The form I will take will cover a myriad of things surrounding what Philip Wylie, including quotes, what he wrote to attract the attention of the USA government and how that worked out for him in the end. Sadly, for now, because of time constraints and the ever impounding requirements of a life in pandemic, this article will purely cover what I find on the internet.

Illustrations for Philip Wylie, “The Paradise Crater,” Blue Book Magazine, volume 81, #6, October 1945. [ Source: allinsongallery.com ]

Today, along with me turning 37 years old, 🥳 ( Happy Birthday to me ) let’s see what we can learn from the internet ( and maybe learn from more, who knows? ) about one of the most important things we should pay attention to: History. In order not to repeat it, but instead liberate ourselves from falling into a worn-out hole.

Introduction:

During my cohort to find an accurate cover image for my copy of Philip Wylie’s The Smuggled Atom Bomb on Bookshelf #1 and Beef with Potatoes, an interesting fact stood out while scanning the source of the image’s page at Battered, Tattered, Yellowed, & Creased:

“Wylie was put under house arrest by the FBI after writing a novel with a post-War Nazi plot to use atomic weapons—cutting a little too close for comfort given that the Manhattan Project had yet to conduct its first live test.”

[ Source: Battered, Tattered, Yellowed, & Creased ]

Philip Wylie is tugging my attention: while he wrote a book titled The Paradise Crater, then he was put under house arrest by the FBI for talking about atomic bombs:

“During World War II, writing The Paradise Crater (1945) resulted in Wylie’s house arrest by the federal government; in this work, he described a post-WWII 1965 Nazi conspiracy to develop and use uranium-237 bombs,”[…]

[ Source: Wikipedia.com ]

Who is Philip Wylie?

“Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, he was the son of Presbyterian minister Edmund Melville Wylie and the former Edna Edwards, a novelist, who died when Philip was five years old. His family moved to Montclair, New Jersey and he later attended Princeton University from 1920[-]1923. He married Sally Ondek, and had one child, Karen, an author who became the inventor of animal “clicker” training. After a divorcing his first wife, Philip Wylie married Frederica Ballard who was born and raised in Rushford, New York; they are both buried in Rushford.

[…]

[ Text Source: fantasticfiction.com ] [Image Source: floridamemory.com ]

Wylie also adamantly refused to allow himself to be labeled. In 1948 he wrote, “I am not a Protestant, or a Catholic, or a Jew; I don’t belong to any church or union. I am not and never have been a communist, fascist, leftist, liberal, tory, or rightist.”

[ Source: believermag.com ]

Wow! That’s a lot. This man certainly was busy, and he didn’t like getting put in any sort of box except his house. Bad joke? I’ll let you decide.

What is the Manhattan Project?

“The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom (which initiated the original Tube Alloys project) and Canada.”

[ Image and Text Source: wikipedia.org ]

What was the problem with The Paradise Crater and why did that get him in trouble with the FBI?

Cover of Blue Book magazine volume 81 #6, featuring Philip Wylie’s The Paradise Crater [ Source: philsp.com ]

From what I gather, at the time, no one was supposed to know anything about Uranium isotopes or atomic bombs in general. It was a secret government project and there was a bit of an arms race itself over who would publish the first story about atomic bombs. Let’s see what Washington State University has to say about it:

“Author Philip Wylie, not fortunate enough to be working for the privileged Campbell, found that when he wrote a story depicting a Nazi conspiracy to rule the world through atomic bombs he could not get it published. According to records in agent Harold Ober’s files, Wylie submitted “The Paradise Crater” to him on January 13, 1944; Blue Book, a popular men’s fiction magazine, bought the story, then canceled its publication. A note dated July 3, 1945 explains the cancellation as prompted by security considerations: “War Dept. objects to the use of this. President Conant of Harvard is working on something similar. He promised not to offer to any magazine. Cancel sale.” (James Conant was chairman of the National Defense Research Committee and very much a part of the Manhattan Project. The source of the quote is a letter from Alice Miller of Harold Ober Associates.) According to H. Bruce Franklin, Wylie was placed under house arrest and even threatened with death for his indiscretion (see Countdown to Midnight, p. 15). A month later, the magazine repurchased the story, and a note was added to the file reading, “Atomic bomb released on Japan Aug. 6, 1945.” So Blue Book accomplished the coup of publishing the first atomic bomb story after Hiroshima even though it had been written over a year and a half before. Thus inadvertently began Wylie’s long collaboration with the government’s nuclear weapons planners which was to result in four short stories and three novels relating to nuclear war.

“The Paradise Crater” is an unexceptional counterespionage story in which the hero sabotages the Nazi villains’ store of atomic bombs. An enormous explosion results: flames shoot forty thousand feet into the air; an earthquake wreaks havoc throughout much of the western United States and Canada; a tidal wave roars west from the shores of California and inundates thousands of “Japanese savages on distant Nippon” (the defeated Asian enemy having evidently reverted to barbarism). The mountain within which the bombs were built becomes a crater two miles deep and thirty across. Ever since writers began to grasp the significance of Einstein’s E = mc2, they had been enthusiastically predicting that a cupful of coal could power an entire city. It is not surprising that Wylie supposed that the detonation of a large number of nuclear weapons would create a cataclysm.”

[ Source: Washington State University ]

There is one big question sitting in my mind right now:

Unanswered: How in Hades did Philip Wylie know about atomic bombs before everyone else was suppose to know about them?

EDIT: As Tales From the Neon Beach has pointed out in the comments, this question may be irrelevant.

And, unfortunately I have run out of time for today to cover this subject. Let’s see if we can find out next time I publish this series, and if you wish to contribute at all by what you know in your head or what you can find out, inside or outside the internet feel free to to join in by posting a comment below or sending it straight to me via the contact form. Next time in this series I will focus on the following ( subject to change ):

  • When did atomic bombs become public knowledge?
  • How did Philip Wylie know about atomic bombs before everyone else?
  • Locating the short story that got him in hot water.
  • What happened to Philip Wylie after his house arrest.
  • How his involvement with the government worked out for him.

Guys and gals, until next time – may you find all the happiness that your life can fit in it’s happy spot – S.D. McKinley.

Categories
Memories On Art Opinion Resources

Bookshelf #4 and #5 in One

Ah, the bookshelf . . . what an interesting place these nooks hold in the universe as a reflection of taste, wonder and intrigue. Last time, I started with bookshelf #2 and #3. Today we are double dipping again with #4 and #5. Bookshelf #4 is . . . no books, but a party amongst toys and miscellaneous objects, only. These toys and things don’t like books:

Bookshelf #4 and #5, in it’s entirety.
Bookshelf #4
Left side of bookshelf #4, the audio CDs are as follows: Alanis Morsette So Called Chaos, Music from the motion picture City of Angels, Sarah McLachlan’s Possession, Bush’s Golden State, Bush’s Letting the Cables Sleep, Bush’s Little Things, Chevelle’s Point #1, And last but not least, and empty self titled Days of the New CD case. The pinewood derby kit is from when Dad and I used to win these kinds of competitions. This one didn’t get built, so it holds it’s original form in the box.
We aren’t fan’s of Pop! Figures in particular, but if we see one of something we like AND we like the design of the figure itself, we’ll pick it up. Even the big ones in which we spotted a huge “the child” from Mandalorian yesterday at the COVID-19 shopping mall. The Cheshire Cat is no joke!
Bookshelf #5 in it’s entirety. Hard to see everything here, so next we will move onto see the left and right sides.
Left side of bookshelf #5.
Right side of bookshelf #5.
Categories
Music On Art

Deception in Art: Psymbionic & Of The Trees – One Thing ft. Cristina Soto (Bassnectar Remix)

[ Lyrics @ Genius.com ]

Exhibit A:

Now, here we have a modern example of deception in musical artwork: HEAVY DISCO MUSIC, disguised as Again, do not, and I repeat, do not be fooled by: Psymbionic & Of The Trees – One Thing ft. Cristina Soto (Bassnectar Remix), genre dubstep or a less specific genre – electronic dance music ( not to mention the still video’s use of chromatic aberration‘d butterflies ). However! And so forth, and so on – DO NOT BE FOOLED, because even though this mmmmmmmhm music likes disco balls . . . it, it . . . IT EXPLODES THEM!!

Example of what happens to disco balls after listening to Psymbionic & Of The Trees – One Thing ft. Cristina Soto (Bassnectar Remix)

Something in somewhat of a grey area, it seems. It’s offensive because of it’s fenciveness stance. Through all this, just remember one thing guys: this song takes a liking for disco balls AND it explodes them! A two faced liar in the form of disruptions in the airwaves in between the media source and your ears. Imagine that. It’s distractful, arrogant and pious!

How does this make you feel when the disco ball is literally coming undone?

So, if you are against disco music, THIS MUSIC IS OFFENSIVE. And, if you strongly dislike disco music, THIS MUSIC IS OFFENSIVE as well. Rant over.

Don’t even get me started about how disco evolved into heavy disco, here and how it took a long, grueling 30 years to happen. That’s beyond the scope of this class.

NOTE: If you happen to enjoy it, even after my persuasive argument: throw your earbuds in the trash, confiscate your mother’s decent Pioneer speakers with mandatory 50″ subwoofer, turn them on full blast and attempt to listen to everyone bellow over the top of some electronic music build ups, extra loud bass growls and deceptive woman vocals!

PSA #2: And, if you’re still sadly Facebook’n or SnapChappin’ even after they steal your data and sell it to people that used to work @ Area 51 – just remember good luck making a worthy post on THOSE platforms that can hold any sort of candle to this or any other blog post! Umph!

Bonus:

[ Source: From article titled: We Tried a Recipe from the Mountain Dew Cookbook and It Looks Radioactive @ People.com ]

Guys and gals, until next time – may you find all the happiness that your life can fit in it’s happy spot – S.D. McKinley.

Categories
Music On Art Resources

Friday Fun Trifecta #8

If you remember a while back, we did a segment here on SDMcKinley.com called Friday Fun Links. Fun links have evolved into Friday Fun Trifecta, where I will feature one thing of each – music, book and visual arts. Welcome to Friday Fun Trifecta #8, in appreciation for artwork. I’m a bit late on this post – and, as someone once told me, “If you can’t get here on time, just get here when you can.”

Book:

No more Mr. Nice Guy by Dr. Robert Glover

“1If it frightens you, do it.   2Don’t settle. Every time you settle, you get exactly what you settled for.   3Put yourself first.   4No matter what happens, you will handle it.   5Whatever you do, do it 100%.   6If you do what you have always done, you will get what you have always got.   7You are the only person on this planet responsible for your needs, wants, and happiness.   8Ask for what you want.   9If what you are doing isn’t working, try something different. 10Be clear and direct. 11Learn to say “no.” 12Don’t make excuses. 13If you are an adult, you are old enough to make your own rules. 14Let people help you. 15Be honest with yourself. 16Do not let anyone treat you badly. No one. Ever. 17Remove yourself from a bad situation instead of waiting for the situation to change. 18Don’t tolerate the intolerable — ever. 19Stop blaming. Victims never succeed. 20Live with integrity. Decide what feels right to you, then do it. 21Accept the consequences of your actions. 22Be good to yourself. 23Think “abundance.” 24Face difficult situations and conflict head on. 25Don’t do anything in secret. 26Do it now. 27Be willing to let go of what you have so you can get what you want. 28Have fun. If you are not having fun, something is wrong. 29Give yourself room to fail. There are no mistakes, only learning experiences. 30Control is an illusion. Let go; let life happen. It”

― Robert A. Glover, No More Mr. Nice Guy

[ Quote Source: GoodReads.com ]

Visual:

Paradise by Giovanni di Paolo circa 1445.
Categories
Artwork Compositions Music On Art Resources

Friday Fun Trifecta #7

If you remember a while back, we did a segment here on SDMcKinley.com called Friday Fun Links. Fun links have evolved into Friday Fun Trifecta, where I will feature one thing of each – music, book and visual arts. Welcome to Friday Fun Trifecta #7, in appreciation for artwork. I’m a bit late on this post – and, as someone once told me, “If you can’t get here on time, just get here when you can.”

These are not frivolous activities! Although, they might be frivolous woman hoops.

Visual:

Venus and Adonis [ Image Source: metmuseum.org ] by Raphael ( Raffaello Sanzio or Santi ) 

Music:

[ Lyrics @ Genuis.com ]

This BBC Radio 1 Live Lounge really is one of the best things, ever. Artists covering artists, supporting each others work. Spiraling each other until greatness. It’s the best when the covers come out arguably better than the originals. Hey. You win some and lose some, right?

Categories
On Art Opinion Resources

What I’m Reading: Gridlinked by Neal Asher – An Exerpt

Categories
Music On Art Resources

Friday Fun Trifecta #6

If you remember a while back, we did a segment here on SDMcKinley.com called Friday Fun Links. Fun links have evolved into Friday Fun Trifecta, where I will feature one thing of each – music, book and visual arts. Welcome to Friday Fun Trifecta #6, in appreciation for artwork. I’m a bit late on this post – and, as someone once told me, “If you can’t get here on time, just get here when you can.”

Bonus:

Explore the legend of Dimebag Darrel via his very own guitar vault. Artwork in the form of a musical instrument:

Music:

[ Lyrics @ Genuis.com ]

Book:

The Kill Riff by David J. Schow
Quote from Amazon preview of The Kill Riff by David J. Schow

I picked this book, sort of randomly, ( with the exception of the heaviness of metal, since we are being so metal today, to theme this post ) from a nicely put together book about book about books titled Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of ’70s and ’80s Horror Fiction by Grady Hendrix. I discovered this through a local book store and instead of being an arse and looking up the price on Amazon, in turn ordering it from there: I, instead paid tribute to the store and purchased it from them for helping me discover it. PSA: Don’t be one of those arses:

Categories
Memories On Art Opinion Resources

Bookshelf #3 and #2 in One

You don’t mess with John Wayne after he had Beef with Potatoes. Ha, ha this meme spawned out of a spontaneous joke I made about the baby’s face last night. I said, “Look at her John Wayne face.” Hilarity ensued.

Ah, the bookshelf . . . what an interesting place these nooks hold in the universe as a reflection of taste, wonder and intrigue. Last week, I started with bookshelf #1 and today we are double dipping with #2 and #3. Bookshelf #2 is . . . no books, but a party amongst toys, only. These toys don’t like books:

If you have any questions about these specifically, please do ask. Otherwise, we will move onto the book-book shelf.
Left of Bookshelf #3
Right side of Bookshelf #3. Below, we are moving from left to right since we are still in the northern hemi-sphere, at least last time I checked.
Categories
Music On Art Other Reviews Resources

Friday Fun Trifecta #5 / Xbox Series X Woes

If you remember a while back, we did a segment here on SDMcKinley.com called Friday Fun Links. It has evolved into Friday Fun Trifecta, where I will feature one thing of each – music, book and visual arts. Welcome to Friday Fun Trifecta #5, in appreciation for artwork.

Book:

I really liked this book titled Showdown by Ted Dekker, main element being the writers in the monastery in relations to the town below.

“Live to discover, as long as discovery leads to a love that comes from the Creator… writing was the mirror to life.” ― Ted Dekker, Showdown

[ Quote Source: Good Reads ]

Music:

[ Lyrics @ Genuis.com ]