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Book Reviews Other Reviews

Graphic Novel Review: Paris 2119

Paris 2119 by Zep ( story ) and Dominique Bertail ( illustration ). Yep, we have an optical illusion with the line curvatures on the cover, here. I had to triple check to make sure this image didn’t become amorphous. If my checks had failed, I would have beat it into submission. Is that a pane of glass, separating the light from darkness? Interesting . . .

I received this graphic novel as an ARC in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley.com

Blurb:

Celebrated author Zep (A Story of Men, A Strange and Beautiful Sound) weaves a mystery borne from humanity’s addiction to convenience and technology, and the dangers such addiction can propose. This gorgeously illustrated, poignant sci-fi tale aims a spotlight on current social trends such as over-consumption, climate change, identity theft, and transhumanism. Painted in detailed watercolors by Dominique Bertail, this book evokes the classic science fiction styles of Jean “Moebius” Giraud, Enki Bilal, and Jean-Claude Mézières.


Since the creators opted to list the social trends covered, I will make a quick one-liner note about their relation to this story:

  • Over-consumption: a letting caused pollution leading up to a teleportation device that is problematic in it’s deceitful nature. All in attempt to fix a problem that just ends in more problems.
  • Climate change: atmospheric disinfection program that causes it to rain non-stop.
  • Identity theft: What happens after attempting to contain a man after you erase his identity? Trouble.
  • Transhumanism: digital clones, teleportation, privacy concerns potentially all leading to mental and physical problems.

The choice of art style here is interesting, as the extended description on Amazon says, “[…]in a classic style reminiscent of legendary French graphic novelists such as Bilal, Moebius, and Mezieres.” The art style isn’t futuristic, but rather archaic:

Inside art style for Paris 2119.
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Creative Methods Memories On Art Resources

On ‘A Scanner Darkly’ by Philip K. Dick

A Scanner Darkly © WARNER BROS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

WARNING: Some elements of this post are NSFW, as also the suggestive themes and premise of this book and movie. The movie is Rated R for drug and sexual content, language and a brief violent image.

S.D. McKinley.com presents a quick dive into the book and film, A Scanner Darkly.

I must not have been as big of a fanatic I thought I was about the story A Scanner Darkly, because I just learned that the movie was first a book by Philip K. Dick.

NSFW Video clip of the movie A Scanner Darkly. I am not the creator of this video.
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Book Reviews

DNF Review: Neuromancer by William Gibson

This is the cover of the mass market paperback copy I received, even though it didn’t match the one that I ordered, I decided not to rain hellfire upon the heads of the Amazon customer service agents that day. I’m really not sure what is going on with this cover. It is not well. It’s worse than not well, it’s terrible. In the middle there, that’s probably an image of some expensive art that William purchased after he made his first $20k off this book. It might still be hanging in his living room.

Summary:

( Extracted from Amazon )

Case was the sharpest data-thief in the matrix—until he crossed the wrong people and they crippled his nervous system, banishing him from cyberspace. Now a mysterious new employer has recruited him for a last-chance run at an unthinkably powerful artificial intelligence. With a dead man riding shotgun and Molly, a mirror-eyed street-samurai, to watch his back, Case is ready for the adventure that upped the ante on an entire genre of fiction.

Neuromancer was the first fully-realized glimpse of humankind’s digital future—a shocking vision that has challenged our assumptions about technology and ourselves, reinvented the way we speak and think, and forever altered the landscape of our imaginations.

Evaluation:

I’m mad at this book. This is the exact reason you read the preview on Amazon before purchasing and not by the blurb alone ( which I obviously didn’t read the preview ). The blurb had me excited as all get out because I love Matrix style neuro-hacking cyberpunk futuristic bull crap ( I like it better when it’s the bull and not the crap part ). I’m a futurist at heart, so this book left me first – mouth watering and hungry, and in the end scathing in the current state of configuration while I’m in writing this article.

SIDE NOTE: This is all William Gibson’s fault, haha – Elon Musk’s Neuralink update: How to watch, start time, ‘working’ device demo