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Book Reviews

Review: John Dies at the End by David Wong

Dual cover for Film and book – John Dies at the End by David Wong. I like this 70’s vibe.

WARNING: This book contains adult themes such as violence and drug use, even if that drug is named after a condiment. And, if you are apt to be offended, this book will probably offend you.

STOP. You should not have touched this flyer with your bare hands. NO, don’t put it down. It’s too late. They’re watching you. My name is David Wong. My best friend is John. Those names are fake. You might want to change yours. You may not want to know about the things you’ll read on these pages, about the sauce, about Korrok, about the invasion, and the future. But it’s too late. You touched the book. You’re in the game. You’re under the eye. The only defense is knowledge. You need to read this book, to the end. Even the part with the bratwurst. Why? You just have to trust me.

The important thing is this: The drug is called Soy Sauce and it gives users a window into another dimension. John and I never had the chance to say no. You still do. I’m sorry to have involved you in this, I really am. But as you read about these terrible events and the very dark epoch the world is about to enter as a result, it is crucial you keep one thing in mind: None of this was my fault.

If you were to mish-mash the American party scene with the supernatural and an anything goes story of impending doom you get John Dies at the End. It’s a satirical, quick page turning parody adventure with plenty of humor and supernatural scares and it tackles these two with a main over-arching theme of science fiction. It’s punchy, sarcastic, fun and the best part – unpredictable. Wong creates fresh ideas that include, just like the blurb says – bratwurst in a special kind of configuration that is not well. With twists galore on not so common life turned into fiction, like characters with celebrity names, but aren’t celebrities and these are executed with finesse and David Wong gets away with literary murder via pen and paper.

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Resources

Nov. 2020 Book Haul

October is almost over and the horror reading will be winding itself down, here shortly. It was a great month for reading and writing, but it will be a nice change of pace because now I have several cobwebs growing in my brain. I didn’t quite read everything I meant to with Corpsepaint by David Peak and Wytches Vol. 1 by Scott Snyder sadly taking a bench seat on the Halloween 2020 reading list.

Remember, kids. The horror reads you. You don’t read the horror.

But, pay no mind, because November is practically here and we will have a wide variety of things to read. These books listed here are all paperback book haul here in November. Don’t even ask me about my eBook Haul. 🤣

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Creative Methods Memories On Art Resources

On ‘A Scanner Darkly’ by Philip K. Dick

A Scanner Darkly © WARNER BROS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

WARNING: Some elements of this post are NSFW, as also the suggestive themes and premise of this book and movie. The movie is Rated R for drug and sexual content, language and a brief violent image.

S.D. McKinley.com presents a quick dive into the book and film, A Scanner Darkly.

I must not have been as big of a fanatic I thought I was about the story A Scanner Darkly, because I just learned that the movie was first a book by Philip K. Dick.

NSFW Video clip of the movie A Scanner Darkly. I am not the creator of this video.
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Book Reviews

Review: Stephen King’s The Stand Vol. 1: Captain Trips THB

This looks exciting. Personally, I’m not a fan of blended photos. However, overall the art here is well done, but the text blending effects such as that glow, could use to be turned down a couple notches.

Summary:

( Extracted from Amazon )

It all begins here: the epic apocalyptic battle between good and evil. On a secret army base in the Californian desert, something has gone horribly, terribly wrong. Something will send Charlie Campion, his wife and daughter fleeing in the middle of the night. Unfortunately for the Campion family, and the rest of America, they are unaware that all three of them are carrying a deadly cargo: a virus that will spread from person to person like wildfire, triggering a massive wave of disease and death, prefacing humanity’s last stand. Collects The Stand: Captain Trips #1-5.

Evaluation:

What is a THB you ask? Trade hard back unlike trade paper back. It’s a hard cover graphic noveleta. Don’t ask me what noveleta means. Marvel might know. That is who published the book. 🐵

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Book Reviews

Review: The Alien Interviews by Chet Novicki

This modern looking, high quality cover represents the book well. Greys or Grays? tomato tomoto, blah blah blah, you get the point. ;D

Summary:

( Extracted from Book Barbarian )

I just got a phone call from my old friend, Jimmy. Only trouble is, Jimmy died 40 years ago.

So what’s he been doing while he’s been “dead”? Interviewing little gray aliens for the government, according to him. And keeping notes. Now he wants to tell me all about it, but someone doesn’t want me to know and is working hard to keep me from finding out!

A highly unusual novel with a unique take on the “alien experience” – who they are, where they come from and what they’re doing here, plus who we are,what we’re doing here, and what happens when we die. Set in modern-day (now) Florida, USA. American English.

Evaluation:

Chet Novicki presents The Alien Interviews in a digestible format. I was able to follow right along with the story from page one without any indiscernible noise that some other books present at the beginning ( neither a pro or a con in my opinion ).

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Book Reviews

Review: The Teleporter by Lee Hall

Book covers don’t get much better than this. A classy bar setting type feel which fits perfectly. I feel like I’m missing an olive and a toothpick? Not quite sure what the review quote on the right is referring to, haha. Fun fact – the defocused effect of the background is called Bokeh.

Summary:

( Extracted from Amazon )

What if there was a power like no other? What if one drunken slouch happened to stumble where nobody has stumbled before and discovered the ability to teleport!
Just when you thought there were enough super hero stories in this world, we made another one…
Kurt Wiseman is your average mid-twenties slouch with a serial thirst for alcohol, that is until destiny calls upon him to stumble where no man has clumsily stumbled before. By day he works for a familiar sounding, power hungry, media controlling, mega rich American businessman who represents everything wrong with society today. Whilst investigating this politically loaded story arc Kurt accidentally acquires a super power like no other. The ability to teleport!
Before he can think about saving the day, Wiseman must endure a journey of self-reflection by earning the trust of his friends and overcoming his greatest weakness, booze. Even if the path is filled with comic book cliché, inappropriate one liners and genre busting fourth wall action.
Not all heroes in this world are the same and with great power comes the possibility to go viral! This is a story that will unite humanity…
Kurt Wiseman is the Teleporter!

Evaluation:

I can’t really pick any two word combination in this whole book that I can scoff at, or three word combination, or four words either. Heck, there isn’t even a whole sentence I don’t like, or paragraph or a chapter. Okay, okay. The whole book is great.

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Book Reviews

Review: Elevation by Stephen King

This digital version cover of the book is nice, but not quite as nice as the paperback version which has a foil cover to give it that reflective, shiny look.

Summary:

( Extracted from Amazon )

Although Scott Carey doesn’t look any different, he’s been steadily losing weight. There are a couple of other odd things, too. He weighs the same in his clothes and out of them, no matter how heavy they are. Scott doesn’t want to be poked and prodded. He mostly just wants someone else to know, and he trusts Doctor Bob Ellis.

In the small town of Castle Rock, the setting of many of King’s most iconic stories, Scott is engaged in a low grade—but escalating—battle with the lesbians next door whose dog regularly drops his business on Scott’s lawn. One of the women is friendly; the other, cold as ice. Both are trying to launch a new restaurant, but the people of Castle Rock want no part of a gay married couple, and the place is in trouble. When Scott finally understands the prejudices they face—including his own—he tries to help. Unlikely alliances, the annual foot race, and the mystery of Scott’s affliction bring out the best in people who have indulged the worst in themselves and others.

Evaluation:

Reading Stephen King’s Elevation at first was not my cup of tea. I put the book down after reading a couple of pages at first, and it wasn’t because my ADD was kicking in – not a good sign. Then it became a little more tasteful as I read further, but not what I expected at all. I’ve read another short story / novella by Stephen King – The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon ( EDIT: I looked it up and the story mentioned is NOT a novella or short story, it’s a full length novel ) I liked the latter story better.